Author Topic: Rewilding - the other side of the story  (Read 443 times)

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Offline admin

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Rewilding - the other side of the story
« on: April 28, 2021, 09:10:56 AM »
I wonder what the campervan-interned weekend urban  naturalists would make of this? This just has to end in tears.

 
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Offline burnie

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2021, 11:16:17 AM »
Just wait until they re-introduce Lynx and that idiot Roy Dennis wanted to include Wolves and Bears as well.
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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2021, 12:01:30 PM »
I just can't figure out 2 things.

1. Why would anyone choose to introduce sea eagles to a highly populated area like the I.O.W?

2. Why don't they shoot a few crows? Even the RSPB do that. Since when were crows a protected species?

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Online caorach

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2021, 12:15:07 PM »
I just can't figure out 2 things.

1. Why would anyone choose to introduce sea eagles to a highly populated area like the I.O.W?

2. Why don't they shoot a few crows? Even the RSPB do that. Since when were crows a protected species?

First of all I take exception to the concept that introducing sea eagles in the IoW is any different to introducing them anywhere else. I think this is one of the problems with re-wilding in the sense that the people doing it are keen on the idea that it only impacts a few people in a rural area so this impact doesn't matter. My view remains that all re-wilding should start with a 5 year pilot project in the parks of urban areas before it can be expanded to more rural areas as both places have exactly the same factors - a human population and the environment isn't like it was in the past.

In terms of crows then I honestly don't know, maybe they are shooting them and can't keep on top of the numbers? Crows are a weird bird to shoot in the sense that they are really stupid in one way, groups of them will keep flying in having watched their mates in the previous group getting shot, but they are also really clever in another way in the sense that they remember stuff and once they've had a bad day they often won't come back. That farm looks an ideal candidate for shooting them at long range with a rifle but this is a very slow, time consuming, process as you might only get one or two in a day. Trapping them may also be an option but, again, this is a big job when you've lots of crows.

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2021, 12:53:57 PM »
one of the problems with re-wilding in the sense that the people doing it are keen on the idea that it only impacts a few people in a rural area so this impact doesn't matter.

No doubt about that at all. The trouble is those making the decisions are not impacted and are backed up by politicians  who only answer to their unaffected urban electorate one day in every 5 years.
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Online johnny boy

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2021, 06:34:32 PM »
Maybe Laxdale can shed some light on how easy it is to obtain a licence to shoot crows, personally I would shoot any I could get close enough to if they were "scoping" my flock.

Horrible birds.

I would also consider setting traps (as well as shooting), to get as many of the bastards that I could.

I don't think the above is really very PC but I don't care, I have seen way too often what these birds do to give 2 hoots about people's feelings for the lovely little birds.

Online Laxdale

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2021, 06:40:19 PM »
No licence needed for a hoodie.
In the Western Isles, NS ill grant a licence to shoot ravens pretty much on the strength of a conversation on the phone.
Which is a massive contrast to the attitude of NS on the east coast. There, the raptor mob have called ravens "honorary raptors", so the damage ravens cause goes unchecked as it is almost impossible to get a licence to kill them.
Just more anti landowner nonsense from the RSPB, etc.

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2021, 07:11:40 PM »
Ravens are quite rare in the east, certainly compared to the west but they are more common than they once were. Hoodies are seldom seen either, mostly carrion crows and rooks over this way. I didn't think there was any licence requirement to shoot crows.
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Online Laxdale

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2021, 07:40:23 PM »
I have seen videos of ravens marauding lambing sheep and nesting birds filmed in Tayside, Angus and Caithness. As numerous as starlings, and the word is the population is increasing exponentially.
"Evil on wings" as I like to call them.

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2021, 07:45:02 PM »
We occasionally see ravens when we are out and there is one pair breeds on the cliffs at St. Cyrus on the reserve. 30 years ago we only ever saw them after the stalking season apparently they moved from farther west to feed on the gralloch left on the hill.
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