Author Topic: Rewilding - the other side of the story  (Read 444 times)

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Online Laxdale

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #20 on: April 29, 2021, 09:47:57 AM »
This copy and paste says it all -

"If you think it's bad for curlew, black tailed godwit are far worse. We have at most 50 pairs mostly on RSPB reserves in the Nene washes and they are predated by foxes, crows, red kites and Marsh harriers to the extent that they can no longer produce fledged young. They are now taking the eggs and brood managing the chicks releasing them at fledgling stage. Without this completely artificial arrangement the bird would be extinct in Britain in a few years.
At some point the conservation industry must decide between taking hard decisions and saving ground nesting birds on the one hand and pretending that habitat manipulation can solve everything so that they can make loads of money on the other.  Perhaps I'm wrong and they have already made the decision to go for the money. 
Holland is even worse as predator control is at a level that would satisfy even  Wild Justice and the Black tailed godwit, Holland's national bird is effectively doomed to be predated out of existence."

Offline admin

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #21 on: April 29, 2021, 11:07:43 AM »
You see the problem is it looks like those who make the decisions  seldom stray far from the radiator in their comfy office in Edinburgh or Inverness. Local people should be consulted - not have a veto - but they should be consulted.
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Online Laxdale

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #22 on: April 29, 2021, 11:29:44 AM »
Those affected must be able to veto decisions that will cost them money.
The problem is that they do not.
Minority rights?
Crofters are now more of an endangered species than bloody eagles.

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #23 on: April 29, 2021, 11:41:10 AM »
It's lefty - green -  PC  Scottish politicians who are to blame. They are more likely to listen to the likes of Greta Thunderbird than to local stakeholders whom they appear regard as ignorant, ill educated or even worse Tory landowners and their supporters. I mean how many crofters and farmers do you know who have a gender studies and climate change degree?   :lol:
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Offline johnny boy

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #24 on: April 29, 2021, 06:23:18 PM »
Quote
  I mean how many crofters and farmers do you know who have a gender studies and climate change degree 

Most crofters and farmers do have that degree, its just not written on a piece of paper based on 4 years of classroom theory.

Online Laxdale

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Offline admin

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #26 on: April 29, 2021, 07:04:36 PM »
:lol: :lol: :lol:

https://greens.scot/news/scottish-greens-reveal-national-parks-plan
:lol: :lol: :lol: indeed.

M goodness with all those generous giveaways, nationalism of this and that  proposed by the SNP and Greens exploitation of Scotland's oil must surely be back on the agenda to pay for it all - or perhaps they just think we really are thick and gullible.  :lol:

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Online Laxdale

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #27 on: April 30, 2021, 07:56:49 AM »
A copy and paste -
"Managed to start getting ewes and lambs out of fields and out to their hill, not much to eat out there but they need back to their territory. 5 lambs now have vanished without trace. I like the wee ewe in the picture, she lambed about a week ago, I congratulated her, apologies for the lack of grass and told her they'd all be getting shifted asap, today she came in with her crew to get tick control for her lamb but no lamb with her and there was no dead lamb to be found in the field, she'd been in, if there had been she would have been with it, she's a good mum but she is blind now in one side of her udder so career is over. The other pictures are of a lamb I eventually found today on the hill because I could see a very upset ewe was telling me something was wrong, this was a strong healthy fit lamb that was put out about a week ago, this lamb did not just die, its back is full of talon marks, I would say this lamb was probably lifted whilst sunbathing and dropped, then eaten in front of a very distressed sheep. Lambs are getting taken from Kilmory too. These birds are far too densely populated. I am going to email SNH to find out their long term plans for these birds so I know if I should bother making any long term plans, are they just going to keep increasing with no thought to any other wildlife or people's livelihood. I've already spent a lot extra on feed this spring and now I'm probably going to spend the summer feeding the sea eagle. I'm not saying that they shouldn't be here because that will never happen but there needs to be some kind of control put in place, have they even planned for the reintroduction being too successful, if its natural for them to lift lambs then when nature blows the nest out of the tree or the chick falls out then that should be left and no intervention, its nature after all. It's hard enough, every year weather brings different challenges that we have to deal with but this challenge is so upsetting and there isn't a single thing I can do about it."


Reminds me of the guy who was feeding his sheep in a small Sy croft last May, despite there being plenty of grass on his home crofts in S Lochs. He would lose too many lambs if he put them out before they were 2 months old.
This is not a viable solution long term, and I fully expect eagles to be getting bumped off left, right and centre in the next year or two.

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #28 on: April 30, 2021, 08:46:59 AM »
are they just going to keep increasing with no thought to any other wildlife or people's livelihood.

I think we already know the answer to that.
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Offline Inchlaggan

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Re: Rewilding - the other side of the story
« Reply #29 on: April 30, 2021, 01:00:50 PM »
What got on my mammaries was statements about how many "millions of quid" reintroduction brings to the local economy.
I asked for the data and got a "we estimate, it is expected, hopefully, data from the USofA Parks and Recreation, in Germany" bullcrap answer.
OK, "How much was paid out in compensation for livestock losses?"- "Releasing this information would be a breach of commercial confidence."
'til a voice as bad as conscience,
rang interminable changes,
on an everlasting whisper,
day and night repeated so-
"Something hidden, go and find it,
Go and look beyond the ranges,
Something lost beyond the ranges,
Lost and waiting for you,
Go."